Kosher Meat Must Meet Specific Regulations

0
636

Kosher Meat

Jewish law says that in order for any meat to be considered kosher, it must meet certain criteria. It must come from ruminant animals with cloven or split hooves. These animals include cows, sheep, goats, lambs, oxen, and deer. Ruminant animals all have a digestive system that is different from humans. Instead of one compartment to the stomach, the listed animals have four. The rumen is the largest of the four compartments and the main digestive center. Another Jewish requirement for kosher meat is that it can only come from the forequarters of kosher ruminant animals. Aside from having split hooves, they must chew their cud. The meat must be soaked to remove any traces of blood before cooking. Fish must have fins and removable scales to be considered kosher. Only a few birds are considered kosher. Finally, all kosher food must be prepared by following Jewish Dietary Laws. All utensils used in slaughtering, cleaning, preparing, and packaging the meat must be kosher. 

Specific Requirements For Kosher Meat

Jewish law says that in order for any meat to be considered kosher, it must meet certain criteria. It must come from ruminant animals with cloven or split hooves. These animals include cows, sheep, goats, lambs, oxen, and deer. Ruminant animals all have a digestive system that is different from humans. Instead of one compartment to the stomach, the listed animals have four. The rumen is the largest of the four compartments and the main digestive center. Another Jewish requirement for kosher meat is that it can only come from the forequarters of kosher ruminant animals. Aside from having split hooves, they must chew their cud. The meat must be soaked to remove any traces of blood before cooking. Fish must have fins and removable scales to be considered kosher. Only a few birds are considered kosher. Finally, all kosher food must be prepared by following Jewish Dietary Laws. All utensils used in slaughtering, cleaning, preparing, and packaging the meat must be kosher. 

Kosher Meat Must Be Slaughtered In A Specific Way

Meat can only be kosher when an animal is slaughtered in a specific way. The Rabbi, known as a “shochet,” is specially trained. A very sharp knife is used. It cuts the esophagus, the trachea, carotid arteries, and jugular veins in one smooth move. Experts agree that the kosher slaughter, when performed correctly, is at least as humane as pre-slaughter stunning. 

Pork Is Not Kosher Meat

When the ruminant animals eat their food, they chew their cud. This simply means their food is partially digested and then returns from the stomach to chew once again. Pigs do have split hooves, but they do not chew their cud. This results in pork not being kosher. Further, it is believed that a pig is unclean for Jewish people to eat. The word kosher literally means “clean” or “pure.”  

The Difference Between Kosher Meat and Non-Kosher Meat

It is a fact that kosher foods, in general, are not any purer or more wholesome than other foods. They are not necessarily more nutritious or flavorful, and they have as much sugar or fat as non-kosher foods. Unless the label indicates so, they are not automatically “organic” or “raised without antibiotics.” 

There’s a lot to know and understand when it comes to meat and different foods the Jewish people eat.